UK- Tag Archives - Business News and Updates


Find the latest Legal updates and changes, industry reviews, regulatory updates, expert legal and accounting advice, Q&A with experts, and much more content.

Cheryl Harvey, Seeds of Ayllu Founder Discusses Doing Business in Guatemala and Peru

Cheryl Harvey, Seeds of Ayllu Founder Discusses Doing Business in Guatemala and Peru

Cheryl Harvey shares her perspectives on the challenges of doing business in Guatemala and Peru as a British business owner. Biz Latin Hub's Carina Zambrano had the pleasure of connecting with Cheryl Harvey, Founder and Mindful Director of Seeds of Ayllu Limited and former Country Manager to our office in Lima, Peru. We gained insight into her experience exporting high quality, nutritious, consciously cultivated Brazil Nuts and Cacao from the Amazon Rainforest of Peru and communities in Guatemala to her home region, the United Kingdom. Cheryl shares her perspectives on the challenges of doing business in Guatemala and Peru as a British business owner, as well as the differences in business culture while operating in Latin America.  1. As someone from a small village in the countryside of England, what brought you to Latin America? In 2010, I left England carrying my backpack and in search of adventure. My plan was to travel for 5 months in Latin America and then return to England to contemplate the next step in my accountancy career. Little did I know what this trip had in store for me and that 10 years later I would be living a very different life; living my true life and working in support of the small indigenous farming communities in Peru and Guatemala. 2. What led you to opening your business, Seeds of Ayllu, in Peru and Guatemala? In early 2017, I left behind my management position in Lima, Peru. The major shift came when I spent time in the Amazon Region of Madre de Dios-Peru and did deep inner work with native plant medicine. I now have an incredibly...

British Ambassador Jeff Glekin Highlights Opportunities for People and Business in Bolivia

British Ambassador Jeff Glekin Highlights Opportunities for People and Business in Bolivia

Jeff Glekin shares insights on the work of the British Embassy to strengthen connections with Bolivian people, businesses and institutions. As part of our Q&A series, Biz Latin Hub’s Chelsea Heywood reached out to Jeff Glekin, British Ambassador to Bolivia, to hear about his experience developing British relations with the Latin American country. Jeff has an extensive background in diplomatic roles, previous serving as the Deputy Head of Mission in Bogotá, Colombia, Deputy Head of Commercial and Economic Diplomacy for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, and Deputy Head of Mission in Mumbai, India. In this discussion, Jeff shares insights on the work of the British Embassy to strengthen connections with Bolivian people, businesses and institutions. Bolivia is an economy often overshadowed by its neighbours. What advantages does Bolivia offer British nationals and businesses that people may not necessarily know about? Bolivia has been growing faster than most Latin American countries for the last 10 years with the poverty levels decreasing significantly during that period. Its biggest city and business hub, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, is one of the fastest growing urban conglomerates in the entire emerging world and has strong commercial linkages with Argentina and Brazil, two of the largest markets in the region. In that sense, there are several business opportunities for British firms in Bolivia, both in terms of British exports to Bolivia or profitable investment in the country.  Sectors that deserve particular attention are Mining (lithium, rare earths and other...

Peru and the UK Sign Reconstruction Agreement

Peru and the UK Sign Reconstruction Agreement

In June 2020, the UK government won Peru’s bid for the “Integral plan for the reconstruction of the damaged infrastructure of the Northern regions of Peru affected by floods in 2017", also called the Reconstruction Agreement or Programme. This government-to-government agreement involves the reconstruction of Peruvian infrastructure and the construction of preventative measures against natural disasters. Parties involved in the Peru-UK Reconstruction Agreement The Reconstruction Agreement involves an investment of approximately US$2.020 billion. The Reconstruction Agreement was signed on 22 June 2020, between the Peruvian government, represented by the Authority for Reconstruction with Changes (ARCC), and the UK government, represented by the Department for International Trade (DIT). The investment is worth S/7 billion (approximately US$2.020 billion) and will last for 2 years, with allowance for a third year. The project will be carried out by 3 companies forming the UK Delivery Team: Mace Limited, Arup Limited and Gleeds International Limited. The Peru-UK partnership is an enduring one. The UK was Peru’s lead partner while delivering the Lima 2019 Games, the fourth largest sports event in the world. Following the success of this partnership, the Reconstruction Agreement only further strengthens these regional commitments. Reconstruction projects The 2017 Coastal El Niño is a natural disaster that severely affected many Peruvian regions. Heavy rains, landslides, and floods destroyed infrastructure and crops, leaving people homeless. The Peru-UK Reconstruction Agreement...

Perceptions of Doing Business in Latin America: Cautious Optimism For Future Growth and Opportunities

Perceptions of Doing Business in Latin America: Cautious Optimism For Future Growth and Opportunities

In June 2020, the Biz Latin Hub team launched a survey asking for information about individuals’ perceptions about doing business in Latin America. In June 2020, the Biz Latin Hub team launched a survey asking for information about individuals’ perceptions about doing business in Latin America. We received a range of responses from 75 business owners, executives, government officials and other specialists operating in over 40 countries worldwide. 57.3% of respondents are considering expanding into the region in the future, with many expressing cautious optimism at economies' abilities to bounce back after the COVID-19 pandemic. Find out what the key takeaways from our survey indicate about people’s perceptions on doing business in Latin America. Perceptions on doing business in Latin America: who took part? 75 people responded to the Doing Business in Latin America survey. Of our respondents, nearly half (48%) were business owners, operating in Latin America and across other regions of the world, including the United States, Europe, Asia, the South Pacific, and the Middle East. 29 respondents (38.6% overall) were business owners operating in Latin America. Many survey participants were operating across more than one country. Of all respondents, 66 people (88%) noted they were working or operating their business within Latin America, and 39 respondents (52%) were operating outside of the region. A third of all respondents were running or working in a company that operates in 5 or more countries, and 16% of all respondents claimed to be operating across 10 or more...

Business Potential for British Companies in Latin America

Business Potential for British Companies in Latin America

In recent times, market observers have noted an increase in interest from British companies in Latin America. Since 31 January 2020, the United Kingdom has officially exited the European Union due to the referendum in 2016, which voted for the so-called Brexit. As a consequence, the UK cannot take advantage of the free-trade market and the non-tariff barriers of the EU.In order to keep their internationally strong economic status, they need to establish new trade relationships. A long history, tracing back to the 19th century, connects the United Kingdom and Latin America. In times of economic uncertainty, the British now rely on their ‘old friendship’. We outline trade opportunities for British companies in the Latin American market. International relations supporting British companies in Latin America British officials are regularly inviting leaders of Latin American countries and increasing diplomatic staff numbers across Latin America, as well as reopening British Embassies. The United Kingdom was one of the first countries to recognize the potential of Latin America in the 19th century. As a result, they played a key role in the independence movements in Latin America by providing military and financial support. As an example, thousands of British volunteers fought in the armies of the Colombian Liberator, Simon Bolivar. Due to these close links, the United Kingdom has contributed enormously to Latin America's early economic development. In the 20th century, the United Kingdom somewhat neglected the once-interwoven relationship with the Latin American nations and...

Overview: UK Business Growth in Latin America

Overview: UK Business Growth in Latin America

UK businesses are facing a critical time and those that trade overseas are increasingly looking to new markets to offset the looming challenges of exiting the EU. Proactive companies are looking to the high growth markets of Asia, Latin America and India where new technologies, unique brands and innovative solutions are in demand. Cooperation between Latin America and the UK “We are turning around decades of British withdrawal in Latin America. Now I think it is universally understood across the capitals of the region that Britain is expanding. Britain is coming back” - William Hague. The UK’s trading relationship with Latin America can be seen in the context of the historically close economic ties that existed in the mid-1800s. Evidence can be seen in the original mines, where British miners were involved in the early development, and it’s visible in the infrastructure and railways that cross the continent. There was a significant decline in the UK’s trade with the region after the First World War, and UK companies then developed closer links with US and European markets. Not so long ago, UK imports into Latin America were at just over 1% of the goods and machinery coming into these markets. More recently, UK Governments have sought to change that: William Hague, the then Foreign Secretary, visited in 2012 and announced that “We are turning around decades of British withdrawal in Latin America. Now I think it is universally understood across the capitals of the region that Britain is expanding. Britain is coming back”. Since then there have been numerous...

UK-Chile Trade Continuity Agreement: What Does This Mean for Businesses?

UK-Chile Trade Continuity Agreement: What Does This Mean for Businesses?

In modern-day globalized economies, an important factor in doing business is trade agreements. These agreements allow companies to enter countries with ease and allow them to avoid trade tariffs to varying degrees. This gives competitive advantages to international companies eligible to operate under these agreements. By the same token, trade agreements can fall victim to uncertainty due to legislative or governmental change, companies are on edge. The implications of new or modified trade deals need to be carefully evaluated.  As the United Kingdom (UK) is preparing to leave the European Union (EU), all trade agreements the UK held while under the EU’s umbrella will cease to exist. The UK is now reaching out to strike new agreements to keep its economy diversified. One country to recently partner with the UK is Chile, called the Trade Continuity Agreement. Powerful in their own rights, the cooperation of these two countries offers positive trade benefits for businesses at both ends. Find out what the UK's trade deal with Chile means for companies and prospective investors. Overview: UK and Chile's trade relationship With the pending Brexit, the United Kingdom is taking care of its trade agreements and economic ties with other countries. Chile is a big export partner of the UK with the UK exporting a worth of $771M to the country. As the UK wine market is heavily dependent on Chile, the trade relationship between the two countries is very important. Moreover, Chile imports an estimate of $791M from the UK. The Chilean gas turbines sector is heavily dependent on the...

Pin It on Pinterest